Another Puzzle – 2020

houses

This puzzle has been attributed to Albert Einstein, and it has been claimed that only 2% of the population can solve it.  I doubt it.  It’s rather simple, actually, once you discover the key.  There is no trick to it; it’s pure reason.  However, there is a method – and that’s the key.  I’ve updated it slightly for the 21st century, but other than that, it’s the same puzzle I was given [mumble, mumble] years ago.  Now, it’s your turn to give it a try.  Good luck!  (I’ll give you the answer next Tuesday.)

———————————————

There are five houses in a row.  Each is painted a different colour and each inhabitant is a different nationality.  They each own different pets, drink different beverages and drive different cars.

From the clues below, figure out who drinks water and who owns the zebra.

1 – The Englishman lives in the red house.

2 – The Spaniard owns a dog.

3 – Coffee is drunk in the green house.

4 – The Ukrainian drinks tea.

5 – The green house is immediately to the right of the ivory house.

6 – The man who owns snails drives a Buick.

7 – The man in the yellow house drives a Cadillac.

8 – Milk is drunk in the middle house.

9 – The Norwegian lives in the first house.

10 – The man who drives a Ford lives next to the man who owns a fox.

11 – The house with the Cadillac is next to the house with the horse.

12 – The man who drives the Chevrolet drinks orange juice.

13 – The man from Japan drives a Dodge.

14 – The Norwegian lives next to the blue house.

————————————————-

 

Tuesday’s Puzzle Answers

Here are the answers to Tuesday’s puzzle.  I’ve left a space after the first two in case you want to go back to Tuesday’s post and try your luck again

A, P and A are the 3 M
Athos, Porthos and Aramis are the 3 Musketeers
There are 2 S to every A
There are 2 sides to every argument

puzzle

88 K on a P
88 keys on a piano

24 H in a D
24 hours in a day

90 D in a R A
90 degrees in a right angle

6 S. on a S S
6 sides on a Stop Sign

3 S and you’re O
3 strikes and you’re out

There are 8 N in an O
There are 8 notes in an octave

8 P in the S.S. plus P
8 planets in the Solar System plus Pluto

1 P is worth 1,000 W
1 picture is worth 1,000 words
7 W of the A W
7 Wonders of the Ancient World

1 W on a U
1 wheel on a unicycle

64 S on a C B
64 squares on a chess board

20,000 L under the S
20,000 Leagues Under the Sea

G and the 3 B
Goldilocks and the 3 Bears

1 is the L N
1 is the loneliest number

12 L of H
12 Labours of Hercules

28 D in F except in a L Y
28 days in February except in a Leap Year

Every C has 9 L
Every cat has 9 lives

12 D of C
12 days of Christmas

4 S in a S D of C
4 suits in a standard deck of cards

2 is C; 3 is a C
2 is company; 3 is a crowd

76 T led the B P
76 Trombones led the Big Parade

12 M in a Y
12 months in a year

K 2 B with 1 S
Kill 2 birds with 1 stone

13 in a B D
13 in a Baker’s Dozen

3 B M
3 blind mice

1001 A N
1001 Arabian Nights

4 H of the A
4 Horsemen of the Apocalypse

3 P in a H G
3 periods in a hockey game

40 D of R in the G F
40 days of rain in the Great Flood

4 Q in a D
4 quarters in a dollar

6 P on a S F
6 points on a snow flake

12 S of the Z
12 signs of the Zodiac

S W and the 7 D
Snow White and the 7 Dwarfs

9 P on a B T
9 players on a baseball team

A Puzzle (NOT Algebra!)

puzzle

Remember back in high school when you spent two semesters in algebra, hunting for X as if he had stolen something?  Remember how everybody thought it was so-o-o important – but you?   Remember how you don’t remember any of it cuz you’ve never found a practical use for (X+ 3 = 12.)?  This is a puzzle that looks a lot like algebra but isn’t.  Every letter represents a value that has direct relationship to the other letter (or letters) in each example.  Although they are all connected, they must be solved separately.  The groupings are random, and you can start anywhere.  Your first correct answer will lead you to every other solution.  From there, it’s only a matter of deductive reasoning.  However, each answer will still test your practical knowledge.  Good Luck!

A, P and A are the 3 M

There are 2 S to every A

88 K on a P

24 H in a D

90 D in a R A

6 S. on a S.S.

3 S and you’re O

There are 8 N in an O

8 P in the S.S. plus P

1 P is worth 1,000 W

7 W of the A W

1 W on a U

64 S on a C B

20,000 L under the S

G and the 3 B

1 is the L N

12 L of H

28 D in F except in a L Y

Every C has 9 L

12 D of C

4 S in a S D of C

2 is C; 3 is a C

76 T led the B P

12 M in a Y

K 2 B with 1 S

13 in a B D

3 B M

1001 A N

4 H of the A

3 P in a H G

40 D of R in the G F

4 Q in a D

6 P on a S F

12 S of the Z

S W and the 7 D

9 P on a B T

Answers on Friday

How Did She Know — Answers

mystery

We have a winner.  In fact, we have two!  Of all the entries to this week’s mind-baffling puzzles (and, there were quite a few) there were only two who got all three correct.  Amazing?  Not so!  These were tough.  So, our judges (me) decided both exceptional people deserved a prize.  The winners are
Michael from Pennsylvania
and
Sandra from Saskatchewan

Congratulations!  And congratulations to all the other people who tried; your brains must be really tired now.  So here are the answers:

1 – Danielle is having dinner in an expensive restaurant.  She finishes the meal and orders dessert and coffee.  The server brings her cheesecake and a cup of coffee.  Unfortunately, as Danielle is stirring her coffee, she discovers there’s a fly in the cup.  She calls the server back and points out the fly.  The server apologizes profusely and takes the cup and saucer away.  Danielle waits to eat her cheesecake, and in a couple of minutes, the server returns and sets her coffee down.  She lifts up her fork to cut the cheesecake, takes a sip of her coffee  and shouts across the restaurant:
“What are you trying to pull!  This is the same coffee — you just picked the fly out!”

How did she know?

Danielle put sugar in her coffee.  That’s why she was stirring it when she discovered the fly.  When she tasted it, a second time, it was already sweet.  (FYI, Danielle got her meal for free.)

2 – Celeste goes to a business conference in a distant city.  At the end of the first day, she and her colleagues check into a hotel.  Before they go to their rooms, they all agree to meet back in the bar later for drinks.  Celeste is the first to leave the group.  She goes to her room, unpacks her suitcase, has a shower, gets ready and is about to leave to meet her new friends when there’s a knock on the door.  Celeste looks through the security peephole and sees a man she doesn’t recognize, in a dark blue business suit.  She opens the door and, with a startled look on his face, the man politely says:
“I’m terribly sorry; I thought this was my room.  Please excuse me.”
Then he turns and Celeste sees him walk away toward the elevator.  She immediately closes the door and calls hotel security who apprehend a notorious thief in the lobby.

How did she know?

Nobody knocks on their own hotel room door.  (FYI, Celeste got a Good Citizen medal from the local police.)

3 – When Detective Isabel Chambers arrives on the scene, there is a dead man splattered on the street– in front of a hotel with only three windows.  The windows are on the 7th, 8th and 9th floors.  The hotel manager says no-one has gone into the hotel since the accident.  He also tells Officer Chambers that the elevator and stairs are on the other side of the building and there is no access to the roof.  There are two witnesses, a couple walking their dog.  They tell Officer Chambers:
“We didn’t see which window the man jumped out of; we only saw him fall.”
Officer Chambers thanks the couple and goes into the hotel.  She goes to the 7th floor, walks into the room, lights a cigarette, looks around, opens the window, looks down at the body and drops the cigarette.  She watches it fall.  Then she takes the stairs to the 8th floor.  She walks into the room, lights a cigarette, looks around, opens the window, looks down at the body and drops the cigarette.  Again, she watches it fall.  Then she goes to the 9th floor.  She walks into the room, lights a cigarette, looks around, opens the window, looks down at the body and drops the cigarette.  And again, she watches it fall.  All three cigarettes fall within 5 cm. of the body.

Later, when Officer Chambers is examining the body, the couple with the dog say: “It’s such a shame that poor man committed suicide.”
Officer Chambers replies:
“This wasn’t suicide; this was murder.”

How did she know?

All three windows were closed.  If the man committed suicide, he couldn’t have closed the window.  (FYI, the murderer was the hotel manager and Officer Isabel has since quit smoking.)